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Outstanding heritage conservation projects recognized with CAHP awards

DCN-JOC News Services
Outstanding heritage conservation projects recognized with CAHP awards
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF HERITAGE PROFESSIONALS — Notable heritage conservation projects in Canada were recognized recently with awards presented by the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals. The work on Calgary’s City Hall received an Award of Merit in the Conversation – Architecture category for preservation of the building and ensuring the clock tower was reinforced, decorative carvings were updated, the sandstone facade restored and roof replaced.

OTTAWA — Twelve heritage conservation projects from across Canada and the teams that worked on them were recognized with 2021 Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) awards.

The awards are presented annually by the CAHP, a non-profit organization representing heritage professionals from across Canada in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. Awards were presented for projects in conservation architecture, engineering, planning, heritage education and student achievement. 

Award winners were:

  • Award of Excellence in the Conservation – Architecture category, Windsor, Ont.: Work on the John Muir Branch of the Windsor Public Library, which transformed a historic firehall and stable into a community library.
  • Award of Merit in the Conservation – Architecture category, Calgary, Alta.: Preservation work on the sandstone of Calgary’s City Hall included ensuring the clock tower was reinforced, decorative carvings were updated, the sandstone facade restored and roof replaced.
  • Award of merit in the Small and Lovely category, Montebello, Que.: Two historic sites were awarded in this village. Restoration work on the c.1850 home of Louis-Joseph Papineau, a leading figure in 19th century Canadian politics, and his family was recognized with an Award of Merit in the Conservation – Architecture category. Additionally, restoration work on a historic chapel saw the structure’s masonry, roof, doors and windows conserved.
  • Award of Merit in the Conservation – Architecture category, Guelph, Ont.: The reuse of an 1855-constructed rectory saw a building that supports the Basilica Church of Our Lady Immaculate adapted into a priests’ residence and parish offices. Restoration work of the original roof and exterior materials, as well as the construction of a new addition.
  • Award of Excellence in the Conservation – Engineering category, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.: A tower constructed during the War of 1812 was stabilized by conservation engineers. Noted as being the only structure of its kind in Canada, the Fort Mississauga Tower Stabilization project focused on retaining as much of the original building as possible.
  • Award of merit in the Conservation – Engineering category, Baddeck area, Cape Breton, N.S.: Stabilization work on the summer home of telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell and his wife Mabel, built in 1892, was recognized. The project also investigated, documented and evaluated the state of the building so that restoration work could begin.
  • Award of Excellence in the Materials, Craftsmanship and Construction category, Montreal, Que.: A project that conserved the concrete arcades at the Canadian Centre for Architecture’s Sculpture Garden.
  • Award of Merit in the Documentation and Planning category, Oakville, Ont.: A strategy to identify and protect the Oakville Harbour cultural heritage landscape.
  • Toronto: Three projects in Toronto were recognized for exemplary work in heritage conservation. 
    • Award of Merit in the Materials, Craftsmanship and Construction category: At Bishop’s Palace at St. Michael’s Cathedral, a project to stabilize, improve and preserve a deteriorating heritage building envelope.
    • Award of Merit in the Small and Lovely category: Incorporating and restoring the original signs, interior wall murals, wood bar and terrazzo flooring of the legendary Silver Dollar Room into a new high-ise redevelopment on the site.
    • Award of Merit in the Heritage Education, Awareness and Scholarship category: A temporary public art installation at The Oculus Pavilion that covered the Oculus in radiating yellow stripes, visually and symbolically representing the vibrant future planned for this derelict modernist structure.

 A student achievement award was presented to Luke McElcheran from Carleton University for his thesis project which surveyed literature pertaining to heritage trades work in an urban Canadian context and analyzed and compared the frameworks by which levels of government support the trades. 

“When a heritage building is renewed, reused and repurposed well, communities celebrate the places that have shaped them,” said Christienne Uchiyama, president of CAHP, in a statement. “By investing in conserving and adapting a building for re-use, its character and defining elements remain available to future generations.”

More information on the award winners can be found at https://cahp-acecp.ca/2021-awards/

 

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